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JSHR is a multidisciplinary journal that features investigations, studies, and reviews on current topics in sports, physical activity, health and education.

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Domingo, 27 de Mayo de 2018 17:40

EFFECTS OF TRAINING PROGRAMS INTEGRATED ONLY WITH FOOTBALL DRILLS ON THE CARDIOVASCULAR AND NEUROMUSCULAR PERFORMANCE OF AMATEUR FOOTBALLER PLAYERS

 

ABSTRACT

 

This research aimed at analyzing the capacity for acceleration (SP20m and SP30m), change of direction (CODA, 505 test) and cardiovascular capacity (University Montreal Test, UMT) of soccer players competing at the Spanish Third Division (TD) and Regional Preferential (RP). Moreover, this study analyzed the evolution in players' physical fitness over a 12-week period of competition for both teams (September-November), aiming at detecting possible interactions among the different capacities above mentioned. Twenty-four amateurs’ soccer players of the same club took part in this study (19.78 ± 1.24 years, 76.05 ± 8.77 kg, 1.79 ± 0.07 m, 23.57 ± 1.85 kg/m2). Participants did not complete any specific content of physical preparation throughout the training sessions. After 3 training months, no significant differences (p > 0.05, TE, effect size < 0.55, unclear-moderate) were found in any of the groups (Total, TD or RP) regarding straight-line acceleration capacity test (SP20m and SP30m) and CODA (505). However, both the totality of players as well as the TD and RP group obtained a higher maximal aerobic speed (VAM) and maximal aerobic capacity (Vo2max) estimated (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01, TE = 0.52-0.70, small-moderate) in the post-test phase in comparison with the initial pre-test data. The absence of significant improvements regarding the capacity for acceleration and CODA after a period of 12 weeks of training and competition highlights the need of soccer coaches to consider carrying out specific sessions designed to improve players' neuromuscular capacities as a reinforcement of its regular training process.

 

KEY WORDS

test, acceleration, agility, endurance, performance.

 

 
Journal of Sport and Health Research - 2009